How does waste vegetable oil perform in engines? How is it different than the petroleum based fuel?

Im doing a chemistry project and I really need help…

2 Responses to “How does waste vegetable oil perform in engines? How is it different than the petroleum based fuel?”

  1. science teacher Says:

    Both are hydrocarbons.
    The waste vegetable oil needs to be filtered well.
    Water needs to be removed if present.
    It can be used in almost any diesel engines. The injectors need to be reset. Few modifications.
    We have seen many cars in use with it around university areas. They seem to perform okay.

    Wiki has articles on it.

  2. anonymous Says:

    Waste vegetable oils can be used in diesel engines, however they need to go through an intensive refining process before it can be used as a fuel. Both of the fuels are made up of long chains of carbon atoms that yield a large amount of energy. Most vegetable oil comes from either peanut or canola oil while regular diesel is refined from petroleum. The vegetable oil alone can damage an engine if it is not refined first. Much of the fuels mass contains soluble particles that can damage an engine if they are not removed. The oil is mixed with methyl alcohol and sodium hydroxide and allowed to sit. A reaction occurs that separates the good oil from the contaminates like glycerol, a thick black hydrocarbon that is not good for the engine.