How is petroleum a fossil fuel when most petroleum occurs at 10,000 feet deeper than the deepest fossil found?

Oil is being found all over Atlantic oceanic basins and may soon be discovered in other ocean areas around the world. Also, some of the oil wells in Pennsylvania, capped at the end of their production lifetimes, have once again accumulated oil.

3 Responses to “How is petroleum a fossil fuel when most petroleum occurs at 10,000 feet deeper than the deepest fossil found?”

  1. Nat Says:

    I think if you research the term fossil you will answer your own question here!

  2. Bad Moon Rising Says:

    Wrong on too many levels to explain but:

    1. Most oil is actually found at less than 10,000 feet.
    2. Depth has nothing to do with the nature, or type, of fossil, or even the age of the fossil.
    3. In the deep Gulf of Mexico, you are not even into Eocene Age rocks at 15,000 feet and there is a whole pile of more sediment and fossils to encounter before you hit Jurassic "basement" and that isn’t really basement, there are tens of thousands of more feet of fossils and sediment below that!
    4. The only reason you can even find oil at 15,000-20,000 feet is because the sediment is very young and migration has only recently occured. Much of the deep subsalt oil in the GOM will be hard to recover, because it is already on its way to becoming Natural Gas (very bad for ultimate recovery).
    5. You can have fossils down to 50,000 feet!!!! It depends on rates of basin subsidence!

  3. Mitchell Says:

    Bad Moon Rising you have really drunk the kool-aid.