If abiotic methane exists on other planets, why can't abiotic petroleum exist on Earth?

Scientists believe there are lakes of methane on Titan, one of the moons of Saturn.

Methane makes up more than 1% of the atmosphere of Neptune and Uranus.

Mars has methane vents that regularly discharge clouds of methane into the atmosphere.

Why then is it so hard to believe that petroleum has an abiotic source on Earth, which would mean it is much more abundant than currently believed?

3 Responses to “If abiotic methane exists on other planets, why can't abiotic petroleum exist on Earth?”

  1. libs, almost as smart as lint Says:

    It does, what do you think libs spew?

  2. Dan Says:

    The libs are trying to cut down on methane here on earth, They want to get rid of flatulating cows.

  3. A. Lib Says:

    Being abundant and being known and accessible at a price point that does not break the economy are two completely different things. Whether the oil headed to refineries came from ancient algal blooms or an abiogenic source simply does not matter.

    And, Dan, pick up a biology book. The bulk of the methane coming from cows is not expelled through their butts, but rather through their belches. It is a byproduct of the beneficial bacteria in their stomachs that allows them to break down cellulose… you know the stuff in grass.

    There are too many cows, and too many simple-minded neo-cons. I propose we send both off to Titan – one of Jupiter’s moons that is thought to have methane but no life…